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20110701
20110731
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SFGTV2 245
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Jul 11, 2011 11:30pm PDT
quake, where the tempered glass actually kept the building together. it was acting like plywood. big surprise. the tempered caught right at the frames and it was the tempered clearly that was keeping everything together. the building was going this way, and the glass was acting almost like a sheer wall. other times it totally collaps collapsed. seismically, ooh, that's a laurence question. >> they have limits on what both the transient drift and permanent drift is allowed to be, how far they are allowed to sway and how far they're allowed to be out of plumb. what they calculate it to be they come up with a resilient system of setting the glazing so that at the levels of drift there should be no pressure placed against the glazing. so that's the design. we will wait for a big earthquake and see how it plays out. but should be okay. the drift issues are things that we've been talking about for these high rise buildings. what are appropriate drift limits, and how much can a 600 foot building be permanently displaced and still be an acceptable building. how long can we expect the glazing
SFGTV2
Jul 24, 2011 8:00pm PDT
that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program with the commonwealth club of california on the future of cloud computing. our thanks to our distinguished panel for their comments here today. now, we open the floor for a q&a session. we will be passing around a microphone, so if you have questions, please raise your hand and speak into the microphone. >> i have a key question about the backup plan. you mentioned the super bowl earlier. what is the backup plan in the unlikely catastrophic event of the disabling of the system? solar storm or whatever. >> there are lots of things that can go wrong. the rights can hit the planet, and the things go dark, and then we fix it. in general, the technology you are talking about is something
SFGTV2
Jul 2, 2011 5:00pm PDT
against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years. that project is slated to go forward or get through the entitlement process this year in city hall. if you are not familiar, we currently have a california campus and a pacific campus, and the plan is to build a bigger campus and consolidate those services into one larger hospital at the old cathedral hill spa on van ness, and that is going to have a huge impact, both in terms of the neighborhood in district 2, not only the new campus, but what happens to the pacific and california campus. also, is a huge job creator. we're making sure to do it in a way to we have every constituent buy into the project, create a ton of new jobs, and move forward with a health care system that benefits all of us. othe
SFGTV2
Jul 24, 2011 9:30pm PDT
had an attendant that would take a passenger's request and then operate the car. the big change was the emergence of a electric elevators. starting in 1880, the electric elevator allowed building dollars to go much higher. we evolved from steam hydraulic elevators to the electric elevators that are not that much different from what we are going to see now at the top of the tower. this is the steam room on the top of the state st. francis. -- on top of the state francis. the equipment you see painted green, that is all the original equipment from 1972. we are just now in the middle of modernizing this equipment. >> why modernize? doesn't the equipment works fine? >> it does, it is of analog and intensive, and there are some additional controls. let me introduce the foreman to you. this is vince. he can do a better job explaining the project details. >> what is happening here, what are you doing? >> we are doing a major modernization. we are tearing out the old system, logic controls, and generator controls, and we will be going over to solid state. this is not your standard selec
SFGTV2
Jul 25, 2011 8:30pm PDT
't a big hit. he built a more conventional apartment building after that to replace it. it really was the 1906 earthquake and fire that sort of spelled the end of carville. you have these hundreds of thousands of people looking for new homes, suddenly displaced. now they might listen to these men and say, look, you were renting before. you don't want to live there. i've got this lot out here, sand dune. but it's $100. you can build a house here for cheap. suddenly, more conventional houses start being built around carville. and some of the stores that kind of started throughout in carville are used by the neighbors. and you start seeing that these conventional homes start pushing out the cars. so we have these cars in the great highway. but behind we have these more straight forward, real houses. here it is again. they're sort of closing in on it. and writers bemoaned that the old planks that were used between houses and cars were now being replaced by real sidewalks, electricity actually comes out pretty quick. the septic tanks, windmills get replaced by real plumbing. the neighb
SFGTV2
Jul 4, 2011 4:00am PDT
were invited to perform in the presence in upstate new york for the holiday. it was not a big political thing. it was a holiday. we were just going to go and sing sing christmas carols, do some rap songs, whether we could do to cheer up the brothers that were locked up. we started to do it over and over again. it was only 10 years later and that we began to see ways to use that in a more pro-active way. we would come out of a nightclub in new york city, my brother, my cousin, and i. we had had some experience with the police harassing us on the streets. this particular night, somebody had gotten into a fight, we were probably the only black folks in a white neighborhood the party that they were at, they were playing salsa, marvin gaye, and we were hanging out after the birthday party. we got caught up in a situation where the police had been called for shots fired. we happened to be the only black people there, they got us and put us in jail. that was the first day that you mentioned. the long and short of it is, i was in my second year of law school at the time. i am reading all these
SFGTV2
Jul 4, 2011 4:30pm PDT
to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credit union delinquent rate is quite low because we are working with a client. we want to keep that low and as part of our mission. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans.
SFGTV2
Jul 16, 2011 9:00pm PDT
established? >> a big one will be in the middle of march. we will get cost analysis from the retirement system on proposals out there. we will be gauging people's reactions to those numbers as a key market. the first couple of weeks of may will be important. that is when various proposals will be introduced in these chambers for the november ballot. june and july is when the board will vote on what goes in front of the electorate in november. those are the key milestones. >> talk about homelessness and how you are planning to deal with that as an issue. >> the key there is funding. everything gets back to that issue. we have a number of wonderful plans in place on how to address the homeless issue. we just cannot afford to. we continue to cut funding to shelters, public health programs that help our homeless population. if we were able to do what we have in place and fund that, we would be a better position on that issue. >> are there any specific programs with respect to homelessness that you feel are moving us in the right direction? >> the watershed moment was 2002 when gavin newsom passed
SFGTV2
Jul 31, 2011 6:00am PDT
in the neighborhoods is critical. i am optimistic for third street. this is a big part of moving this entire corridor forward. i also want to reiterate something the mayor said. i have the fortune of working with malia cohen. we sit on a land use committee together. she is a tenacious advocate for district 10. she is doing a great job and i am proud to call for my colleague. congratulations, everyone. [applause] >> thank you. my next introduction is someone bittersweet. i know mark leno already did knowledge then risk and -- ed riskin. it is dpw's loss, but it will be mta's game. i know that i will be able to call on him for ongoing report -- support. so with that, it is my pleasure to introduce ed riskin. [applause] >> thank you. it has been a long time coming. the people in the bayview hunters point has it been patient as this project has taken its course. we are delighted to be here today to celebrate a great neck step in this project. the department of public works has the pleasure of working with the library management and commission, and with the community to help envision what the library is t
SFGTV2
Jun 30, 2011 10:00pm PDT
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
SFGTV2
Jul 2, 2011 9:00pm PDT
that carried the heavy downtown interest or big business. you had a lot of candidates on an even keel. what i felt quickly was the strategy to being successful was to build coalitions, and also to approach your communication in a multi land will approach. in my district, it is one of the most ethnically diverse parts of san francisco. we incorporated that. my campaign team was diverse. i had seniors. i had young people. i had different types of volunteers. i had folks that could speak chinese, spanish, someoan, all reaching out to bring people in. there is a certain level of malta and -- of momentum that help people. i would never ask my volunteers to do something i was not willing to do. we were at the bus stop at the morning handing out literature. i think that is critical, to bring into city hall that, yes, i am elected to lead, but more importantly to serve. that is my number one focus point. i am here to serve. when you call me, i am at 4 service. >> what about issues facing san francisco, facing your district, and how you are going to balance the needs of san francisco at large against
SFGTV2
Jul 4, 2011 9:30pm PDT
-- dare i say -- not threatened, but some kind of competition has come in from the big boys? you were having a nice conversation earlier. i listen in. do you see yahoo! going local, for example, as a plus, or do you see them as competition? how did you see that? >> first, full disclosure, yahoo! is a content partner for oakland local. they distribute our content on their website. there is some back and forth. some people are wondering what the corporate industries are going to do in a hyperlocal space. i do think there is space for everyone to work together. one of the questions i'm interested in hearing about is whether the corporate entities are interested in working with local entities. we have been working with oakland for the last year-and-a- half, and i have a background in oakland activism, and it has still been difficult for us to get headway as an organization. that kind of community involvement takes a 24/7 kind of commitment. that is slightly different than the commitment it takes to run a yahoo! new site. i'm interested in with the challenges will be, but i'm much more int
SFGTV2
Jul 12, 2011 2:00pm PDT
it seems like you're basing the program on some of these survey results. but what if there is a big a bite? >> that is why staging the opt out notification is important to us. because if we are wrong on how many customers choose to opt out, we want to be able to reach out to more customers and backfill so that the commitment level we have the best matches the commitment we are making with shell. >> so of people opt out at a lower rate than we expect, it would be great. if they opt out at a higher rate, then we have this reserve a customers to back fill its. president vietor: right. in the marin, 8,000 are currently enrolled. do know how many were invited? >> i do not know how many, but they had about a 20% of doubt rate. they are light green programs. -- they had about a 20% of doubt rate. the dark green program was an opt in the program. remember, their program parameters are different than ours. president vietor: the low-income would still have a reduced rate, but it would still go up, right? >> it would be a subsidized rate. the generation co our service is higher than the generation co
SFGTV2
Jul 12, 2011 4:00pm PDT
. it is an unusual compelling object. we think it will draw people out on the terrace, they will see the big cone and say what is that. then as they approach the cone tell hear these very unusual sounds that were obtained from the cornell orinthology lab. >> we have the largest recording of birds, mammals, frogs and insects and a huge library of videos. so this is an absolutely perfect opportunity for us to team up with a world renown, very creative inspirational artist and put the sounds and sights of the animals that we study into a brand-new context, a context that really allows people to appreciate an esthetic way of the idea that we might live in the world without these sounds or sites. >> in the scientific realm it is shifting baselines. we get used to less and less, diminished expectations of what it was. >> when i came along lobsters six feet long and oysters 12 inches within they days all the oyster beds in new york, manhattan, the harbor would clean the water. so, just getting people to wake up to what was just literally there 200 years ago, 150 years ago. you see the object and say wha
SFGTV2
Jul 15, 2011 1:30am PDT
fascinated me is sumo and sumo wrestlers and how they get so big and what it's like in their culture. one of the brothers becomes an sumo and that's why it's a big book! [laughter]. >> do you think that -- being a woman who is in women have been oppressed -- i don't know if they are now or not, dou think that has stimulated you in your writing coming out of that? you specifically and in general, do you feel like a lot of women have been stimulated by being part of an oppressed class? >> good question. >> very much so. i will try to answer a, b, c. for me, i know that the first thing i began to think about when i thought i wanted to write a novel was that i wanted to write about my culture. and because i had grownup in the chinese culture i wanted to write about china. i wanted to find out more about myself because of i was raised in the bay area and because i didn't know culturally a lot of things i wanted to know. i knew i wasn't going to write about myself and knew that i was not going to write about my family. but i wanted to write about an aspect about china and women. those were t
SFGTV2
Jul 15, 2011 11:30pm PDT
to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and the content you pro
SFGTV2
Jul 18, 2011 6:30pm PDT
] >> and to conclude, can we give a big round of applause -- easy part of this project is now done. the hard part comes in operating it for the next three decades. so could be put it together for property management and social services staff? [applause] thank you, everyone, for coming. we are done. mayor lee: thank you, everybody, for coming. i have asked for the roundtable because oftentimes, information about what we're doing this not get expressed in much detail for a lot of the emerging news outlets, so i wanted a special time with the asian roundtable press just to make sure you can get your questions answered about what we're doing and in particular, i wanted to talk about our pension reform, which is one of the most important things that i think i can contribute to the city as the mayor, and of course, what we're putting on the ballot in addition to that this november would be the street repaving bond. i will begin with the pension reform first and then talk about the bond and attempt to answer any questions you have about things we're doing throughout my administration. in january, as you recal
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)